In his Spring Budget 2021, Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak announced a series of additional business support measures to help those businesses struggling as a result of the coronavirus pandemic and lockdown restrictions.

 

Three year carry back of trading losses

Many businesses will have made a loss in the last year as a result of the Coronavirus pandemic and the difficult trading environment.

 

Trading losses can normally only be set against profits of the preceding accounting period or previous tax year in the case of unincorporated businesses.

 

The chancellor has announced that the carry back period will be temporarily increased to three years thereby enabling the business to obtain a tax refund. For companies this will apply to loss making accounting periods ending in the period 1 April 2020 to 31 March 2022. For unincorporated traders, the extended loss relief will apply to losses incurred in 2020/21 and 2021/22.

 

The amount of trading losses that can be carried back to the preceding year remains unlimited for companies. After carry back to the preceding year, a maximum of £2,000,000 of unused losses will then be available for carry back against profits of the same trade of the previous 2 years. There will be a similar £2,000,000 limit for unincorporated businesses.

 

Corporation tax rates to increase to 25% but not for all companies

The UK corporation tax rate is currently one of the lowest rates of the G20 countries and the government states it is committed to keeping the rate competitive.

 

That should have the effect of encouraging companies to remain in the UK and companies to set up here. With other countries considering raising corporate tax rates the chancellor has announced that the UK will follow suit and consequently the rate will increase to 25% from 1 April 2023 where profits exceed £250,000.

 

However, where a company’s profits do not exceed £50,000 the rate will remain at the current 19% rate and there will be a taper above £50,000. Businesses will however be able to take advantage of new tax breaks to encourage investment in equipment and an enhanced carry back of losses.

 

Super-deduction for investment in new equipment

In order to encourage companies to invest in new capital equipment the chancellor announced a radical new “super-deduction” of 130% where they invest in new plant. This would mean that when a company buys plant costing £10,000 they would qualify for a £13,000 deduction in arriving at business profits. The new deduction, which will run for two years from 1 April 2021, will not be available for motor cars. Certain assets such as fixtures in buildings will only qualify for 50% relief in the first year instead of the normal 6% writing down allowance.

If you’d like to discuss your eligibility for any of the above business support measures and how you can access the help available, get in touch.

 

Related services:

Corporate tax services

Tax investigation and representation

Fee protection service